current :   Empty Bed 





The bed is central to my thesis. With it I am interested in the immediacy of the language of the bed within the conditions of the digital. It speaks directly of the body and of bodily experiences from the mundane to the profoundly affecting. It can evoke feelings of familiarity, rest, intimacy, memory, trauma, loss, isolation or death (among many other associations). In the lines made in the fabric a history of movement can be read.
In the 3d scans I took of my empty bed, I observed in the sculptural appearance of the surface associations of materials like paper or clay, terrain and landscape inviting a broader interpration of intimacy in time, material and environment. To me it has become a powerful signifier of presence and absence.  





SILT


In collaboration with the Anchorage Museum in Anchorage, Alaska and the  Polar Lab Artist Residencey, Silt is an exploration of Alaskan glacial silt from multiple views of relation. I was born and raised on the banks of the Nenana River before moving to Fairbanks. The river silt is one of my earliest memories of connecting to my environment. I remember the way it would transform my skin into a sparkling part of the river after covering my hands in it. Whenever I have the opportunity to return home, it is still a powerful signifier of the phenomenal place I am from. It is also a swift reminder of the personal, familial, and communal experiences growing up in Alaska that for me and many other Alaskans were powerful and sometimes very tragic. For the people who live there, the natural landscape and the people are inextricably linked, my aim was to approach silt from this perspective.

sample of silt materials https://vimeo.com/237832850





CONSIDER THE SPOONBILL 

Consider the Spoonbill is in collaboration with the LSU Nature Science Museum and consists of 3d scans of taxidermied Roseate Spoonbill birds as well as Egrets from the museum. The intention of the project is to investigate human’s complicated relationships with animals, wildlife and their precarious relationship with their habitats due to human destruction.